July 2018 Newsletter & Happy 4th of July from NCSP!

In This Issue: Walk in Memory Walk for Hope. Recent Statistics. Get Involved

2018 WALK IN MEMORY WALK FOR HOPE

The 12th Annual “Walk in Memory – Walk for Hope” community suicide prevention awareness walk will be taking place on Saturday, September 15, 2018, in fourteen different communities across the State of Nevada. All walkers are welcome, and all donations are gratefully accepted. Contributions go to the Nevada Coalition for Suicide Prevention to advance its mission.

Download the 2018 WMWH Flyer

This year, we will also be holding our first ever Registration Challenge!  Any helping agencies in Nevada who provide resources, services, or research to prevent suicide are invited to participate. The organization who refers the most number of Walk attendees (minimum of 20) will win a free table at the 2019 Nevada Suicide Prevention Conference ($500 value). You can promote your organization and services you may offer to suicide prevention professionals, advocates, researchers, and interested community members. If you have any questions or would like more information, please send us an email at nevadacsp@gmail.com.

Download the Registration Challenge Flyer

Register Here to Walk

CDC VITAL STATISTICS REPORT
WHAT DOES THIS MEAN FOR NEVADA?

Suicide rates rose across the US from 1999 to 2016 in 49 states in the US.     Nevada was the only state that did not have a significant increase.

  • Nevada had no increase in suicide rates in since 1999, but are still ranked 7th in suicide death rates nation wide.
  • Nevada has done great work in keeping its rates from increasing, but work still needs to be done in order to save more lives.
  • Nevada will continue advocating for suicide prevention by building hope through healing. This movement will continue until everyone in the community understands the signs and symptoms in order to take action.

Thank you for all of your efforts in supporting such an important topic. Let’s keep the good work moving forward, every life is valued.

Sources
CDC 2018 Vital Signs Fact Sheet
CDC 2018 Suicide State Statistics

Want to become more involved with NCSP? 
You can become a volunteer and/or a member!
Please contact the following if interested:
Outreach Committee: Looking for a co-chair & awareness event volunteers
Alice Vo Edwards alicevoedwards@gmail.comPR Committee: Looking for new chairperson
M. Amaris Knight maknight@nvsuicideprevention.orgGrants Committee:  Accepting people with previous grant writing or management experience
Jacqueline Ragin jragin@nvsuicideprevention.org

Advocacy Committee: -Under development
M. Amaris Knight maknight@nvsuicideprevention.org

We are the land of the free, we are the home of the brave. Let’s pay tribute to our brave American Heroes on this special day and forever. 

HAPPY INDEPENDENCE DAY FROM NCSP!

Copyright © 2018 Nevada Coalition for Suicide Prevention, All rights reserved.
Our mailing address is:  Nevada Coalition for Suicide Prevention  205 N Stephanie St Ste D # 149Henderson, NV 89074-8116

 




5 Takeaways on America’s Increasing Suicide Rate

https://www.nytimes.com/2018/06/09/us/suicide-rates-increasing-bourdain.html

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Kate Spade and Anthony Bourdain, who died this past week. Escalating suicide rates have affected nearly every demographic group and place, according to new federal data.CreditLeft: Bebeto Matthews/Associated Press; Right: Chris Pizzello/Invision, via Associated Press

In a week when two celebrities, first the designer Kate Spade and then the chef and television host Anthony Bourdain, took their own lives, new federal data was released showing that suicide rates have been increasing for years in almost every state and across demographic lines.

 

The escalating crisis has affected nearly every group and place, but the study from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention showed that some parts of the country have been hit especially hard. Here’s a closer look at the study and the stories behind some of the data.

Veteran deaths help account for Montana’s high rate.

Montana has the country’s highest suicide rate, and suicides by military veterans are a significant contributor. A state study found that veterans account for more than 20 percent of Montana’s suicides and that veterans have a suicide rate more than twice that of nonveterans.

“All the issues that we have in Montana are magnified in our veteran population,” said Karl Rosston, the state’s suicide prevention coordinator. Mr. Rosston said rural isolation, easy access to guns and a lack of mental health services likely contributed to Montana’s suicide rate, which has been among the country’s highest for decades.

States with the lowest suicide rates have stricter gun laws.

Guns are used in nearly half of all suicides, and ready access to weaponsis one of several risk factors. New Jersey, New York, Massachusetts, Maryland and Connecticut have the country’s lowest suicide rates. Those states are Democratic-leaning in their politics, clustered in the Northeast and have some of the country’s strictest gun control laws, though researchers say many other factors could account for their low rates.

The Giffords Law Center to Prevent Gun Violence, which assigns letter grades to each state based on their strictness, grades each of those five states at a B+ level or higher. Texas and Nebraska, which have slightly higher suicide rates, have comparatively loose gun laws.

White people and men are dying by the thousands.

Suicide rates have increased across gender and geographic lines, but nearly 84 percent of people who kill themselves are white, and about 77 percent are men.

“There are mental health components, but also there’s relationships, employment, a lack of connectedness that we might see in males that increases the risk for suicide,” said Misty Vaughan Allen, Nevada’s state suicide prevention coordinator.

Some point to gun seizure laws as a solution.

Gun control advocates have called for more states to pass laws that allow police officers to seize guns from people they deem dangerous. In Indiana, where such a law has been on the books since 2005, a recent study linked the measure to a 7.5 percent drop from the expected rate of firearm suicides.

“We think that it has thwarted at least several suicides,” said the county sheriff, John Boyd, a Republican. “We’ve at least given them a time period to at least better think about their options and get them the help they need.”

Nevada is a hopeful outlier.

Forty-nine states saw their suicide rates increase over the course of the C.D.C. study, in many cases by double-digit percentages.

Nevada was the lone exception, with a slight reduction in its rate. State officials attributed the improvement to years of work with community groups and in isolated towns where people are at a higher risk of suicide. But the state’s suicide rate remains among the country’s 10 highest.

“We’re still concerned about Nevada,” said Deborah Stone, the author of the C.D.C. study.

If you are having thoughts of suicide, call the National Suicide Prevention Lifeline at 1-800-273-8255 (TALK). You can find a list of additional resources at SpeakingOfSuicide.com/resources. Here’s what you can do when a loved one is severely depressed.

A version of this article appears in print on , on Page A20 of the New York edition with the headline: Rising Rate Of Suicide In America: A Snapshot. Order Reprints | Today’s Paper | Subscribe

WHY ARE SUICIDE RATES RISING EVERYWHERE IN U.S. EXCEPT NEVADA?

http://www.newsweek.com/suicide-suicide-rate-nevada-nevada-department-health-and-human-services-967577

WHY ARE SUICIDE RATES RISING EVERYWHERE IN U.S. EXCEPT NEVADA?

Suicide rates in nearly every state in the U.S. have spiked by 30 percent since 1999, according to a new report by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). The one state that didn’t see a spike? Nevada, where according to the CDC, the rate actually decreased—if only by less than 1 percent.

The latest report, released Thursday, found that 45,000 people died by suicide in 2018. States like Idaho, Montana, Kansas, Oklahoma, Minnesota, and North and South Dakota have had the greatest increases: 38 to 58 percent.

Suicide is the 10th leading cause of death in the country, according to the report. The release of the CDC report comes after the two high-profile deaths: fashion designer Kate Spade and star chef Anthony Bourdain. Spade was found dead in her New York apartment of an apparent suicide on Tuesday. Bourdain’s death was also confirmed to be a suicide after his friend and fellow celebrity chef Eric Ripert found him unresponsive in his hotel room in France.

Misty Vaughan Allen, a suicide-prevention coordinator at the Nevada Department of Health and Human Services (DHHS), told Newsweek that the department’s work with the Nevada Coalition for Suicide Prevention has helped lower the rate of suicide in the state.

117590063Haley Lillibridge, 25, answers the phone at CrisisLink, a suicide and crisis prevention hotline in Arlington, Virginia, on June 23, 2011. The suicide rate in Nevada has remained steady, according to a new Center for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) report.DAN ZAK/THE WASHINGTON POST VIA GETTY IMAGES

Allen, who has been at the department since 1998, said the state had the highest suicide rate in the nation when she started her work.

She told Newsweek that keeping the conversation going about suicide prevention in communities and having a close relationship with other suicide-prevention centers is helping further their work.

“We have always felt suicide prevention is everyone’s business,” Allen said.

According to the Nevada DHHS statistics, 57 percent of suicides are carried out with a firearm. Suicides by firearms have decreased in the state, from 54 percent in 2014 to 51 percent in 2016.

Despite the steadiness of the suicide rate in the state, Allen says there is a lot of work to do. The state’s senior rate of suicide is still nearly double that of the rest of the United States according to a 2018 report by the United Health Foundation.

“We are highly aware we still have high rates, but we will never give up. We have to change culture around mental health, giving help and support,” said Allen. “The more we can do that, the safer our families and communities will be.”

If you have thoughts of suicide, confidential help is available for free at the National Suicide Prevention Lifeline. Call 1-800-273-8255. The line is available 24 hours a day, every day.



CDC: U.S. Suicide Rates Have Climbed Dramatically

https://www.npr.org/sections/health-shots/2018/06/07/617897261/cdc-u-s-suicide-rates-have-climbed-dramatically

Suicide rates have increased in nearly every state over the past two decades, and half of the states have seen suicide rates go up more than 30 percent.

Suicide is a major public health issue, accounting for nearly 45,000 deaths in 2016 alone. That is why the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention in Atlanta decided to take a comprehensive look at suicides from 1999 to 2016.

“Suicide in this country really is a problem that is impacted by so many factors. It’s not just a mental health concern,” says Deborah Stone, a behavioral scientist at the CDC and the lead author of the new study. “There are many different circumstances and factors that contribute to suicide. And so that’s one of the things that this study really shows us. It points to the need for a comprehensive approach to prevention.”

She and her colleagues collected data on suicides from every state. In addition, to better understand the circumstances surrounding suicide, they turned to more detailed information collected by 27 states on suicides that occurred in 2015.

If you or someone you know may be considering suicide, contact the National Suicide Prevention Lifeline at 1-800-273-8255 (En Español: 1-888-628-9454; Deaf and Hard of Hearing: 1-800-799-4889) or the Crisis Text Line by texting 741741.

The rise in suicide rates was highest in the central, northern region of the U.S., with North Dakota, for example, seeing a 57.6 percent increase since 1999. Nevada was the only state that saw no increase, and Delaware saw the smallest increase which was 5.9 percent.

The findings were published in the CDC’s Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report.

Guns were the most common method used for suicide, accounting for almost half of the people who died.

Often, the suicide seemed to happen without warning: 54 percent of the people who killed themselves didn’t have a previously known mental health issue. “Instead, these folks were suffering from other issues, such as relationship problems, substance misuse, physical health problems, job or financial problems, and recent crises or things that were coming up in their lives that they were anticipating,” says Stone.

Researchers and advocacy groups who work to prevent suicide say the report shows that much more needs to be done to tackle this growing problem.

“None of this is surprising information, which is not to trivialize its importance. I think it captures a lot of trends that we’ve been becoming more and more aware of over recent years,” says psychologist Michael Anestis at the University of Southern Mississippi, who researches suicide and is the author of Guns and Suicide: An American Epidemic.

He thinks the general public commonly pictures someone who had been getting treatment for a long period before killing themselves, like fashion designer Kate Spade, who died this week, but that’s often not the case.

That means any public health effort to reduce suicides can’t solely focus on those who have reached out for help. It has to be paired with measures that would make suicidal people less likely to die even if they never went to see a doctor.

The report also cites the need to reduce “access to lethal means” but without explicitly discussing firearms or controversial issues such as gun control legislation. Asked whether that was a deliberate omission, because of the political climate surrounding gun control, Stone said that suicide rates have been increasing across all methods.

“So it’s not just about firearms, it’s also about other methods of suicide such as hanging, suffocation, poisoning and the like,” she said. “We are concerned with all aspects of suicide prevention, including access to lethal means, and so we do include that in a comprehensive approach to suicide prevention.”

But Anestis believes that it’s important to not beat around the bush when it comes to guns and to talk about the importance of things like setting waiting periods for purchase, and storing guns locked and unloaded.

“American suicide is predominantly a firearm issue. Anytime we want to resolve something that involves firearms, we’ve need to talk about firearms explicitly,” he says. “The conversation about firearms and suicide doesn’t have to be a debate about the Second Amendment. It could be a debate about where can we find some common ground that doesn’t simply involve only talking about people with mental illnesses, because as this paper shows, that’s not going to get the job done.”

Research shows that the decision to attempt suicide is often made quickly, in an impulsive way, says Robert Gebbia, the head of the American Foundation for Suicide Prevention.

“You may be thinking about it over time, but that moment when you actually make an attempt is a very short window,” he explains. “If you could make it harder to make that attempt by not having access to the means, often what happens is the feelings will pass, it gives people time for someone to intervene and get them help, so that is a really important preventative step that can be done. And there’s good research to support that.”

Suicide researchers already know a lot of the information in this new report, says Gebbia, “but the public doesn’t. And so a report like this really draws attention to the fact that we need to do a whole lot more to prevent suicide, to save lives.”

He points out, for example, that the nation currently has no federally funded suicide prevention program for adults. “There are some for youth, but they’re very, very tiny,” says Gebbia. “We can’t expect a major public health problem like this to be addressed unless we see the investment.”

The CDC said that people can learn about warning signs of suicide to help people at risk. One resource is the website: www.BeThe1to.com. To reach the National Suicide Prevention Lifeline, call 1-800-273-TALK (8255).


Nevada’s suicide rate among seniors worst in nation, new study finds

By

*Please note: This is based on 2016 numbers and not all of the phrases in this article are in compliance with National Suicide Prevention guidelines.  For additional information, see the CDC WISQARS database

Sundays for Jerome Penaranda meant “mom time” with his 66-year-old mother, Vivian — an afternoon church service followed by traditional Filipino cuisine at Goldilocks bakery in Las Vegas.

So when she didn’t call as usual around 1 p.m. on Sunday, June 25, 2017 — right after her Zumba class — he wondered if something was wrong.

The horrifying answer arrived in the early hours of Monday, when Vivian Penaranda, 66, was found dead in her apartment. The window cracks were covered with pieces of cloth; prescription medications lined a table.

A brief note offered Jerome and his sister an apology and asked Jesus for forgiveness for taking her own life.

Vivian Penaranda was one of nearly 90 people 65 and older who committed suicide in Clark County last year, according to the coroner’s office. That played a big role in making Nevada the state with the highest suicide rate among seniors in the nation, according to a report published Thursday.

Lack of connectedness

About 32 of every 100,000 Nevadans over 65 die from suicide, according to a new report by the United Health Foundation. That’s nearly double the average U.S. suicide rate among seniors and up from the state’s rate of 29.6 per 100,000 in 2017.

Nevada’s last-in-the-nation ranking, a position it has held in four of the five years the foundation has studied suicide rate, is “very concerning,” said Dr. Rhonda Randall, the foundation’s chief medical officer and executive vice president for UnitedHealthcare Retiree Solutions.

One reason for that, she said, is that the report raises more questions than it answers. While suicide is often correlated to frequent mental distress, multiple chronic health conditions and excessive drinking and substance use, Nevada ranks near the middle of the pack in many of those categories.

Richard Egan, suicide prevention training and outreach facilitator for the state’s Office of Suicide Prevention, attributes high rates of suicide to the lack of a feeling of connectedness.

“It’s something we’ve been working on for years,” Egan said. “We always talk about how we can address it, and the thing that we address it with, especially with out elderly, is connectedness: connectedness in family, in communities, in a neighborhood.”

Thursday’s report does contain clues that suggest a lack of community involvement might be an issue. The report measures involvement in volunteer work, for example, which Randall said can point to how actively a person participates in their community.

On that measure, Nevada came in last.

Warning signs

Apart from her weekly visits with her son, Vivian Penaranda largely kept to herself. She lived on her own and kept secrets from her family. Jerome Penaranda said he wasn’t aware of the severity of his mother’s medical conditions, including diabetes and heart problems, until he saw the prescription bottles piling up in her home.

Penaranda said he wishes he’d noticed the warning signs while there was time to intervene. Once in a while, his mom asked for information about life insurance, or said she was depressed. He thinks she worried about burdening him and his sister — a common concern among elderly people with suicidal tendencies, Egan said.

It’s also common for relatives to miss signals that a loved one might be considering ending his or her life, he said. Among the elderly, losing a sense of identity or involvement in family or community are common warning signs. Others include talk or writing indicating hopelessness, a fixation on death, threats to inflict self harm or raw emotions like rage and anxiety. Mood disorders, substance abuse, prior suicide attempts and access to lethal means also are major risk factors, he said.

“It all comes down to a person acting maladaptive or out of character for themselves,” Egan said.

Anyone concerned that a person might be considering ending their life should call the National Suicide Prevention Lifeline at 1-800-273-TALK or reach out to local police.

In her memory

For Penaranda, there will never be enough time to get over the loss of his mother. He reminds his friends now to spend more time with their older loved ones and show them they’re a priority, he said.

Before his mother’s death, Penaranda planned to take her on a vacation to the Philippines, her birth country, after she retired from her cashier job at Excalibur. It would’ve been a retirement gift.

Instead, he tattooed his arm in her memory.

“It says, ‘I can do all things through Christ, who strengthens me,’” Penaranda said. “It’s just a reminder to stay strong, believe in God and just know that she’s up there in a better place.”

Contact Jessie Bekker at jbekker@reviewjournal.com or 702-380-4563. Follow @jessiebekks on Twitter.


Save The Date – 2018 Walk in Memory Walk For Hope


The Nevada Coalition for Suicide Prevention
invites you to join us on
September 15, 2018
12th Annual
Walk in Memory
Walk for Hope
Suicide Prevention Community Walks
Battle Mtn/ Caliente / Carson / Dayton / Elko / Ely / Fallon / Henderson-Las Vegas / Mesquite / Minden / Pahrump / Reno / Winnemucca / Yerington

The Nevada Coalition for Suicide Prevention is dedicated to partnering and collaborating with local and state individuals and organizations for the development and implementation of evidence based suicide prevention, intervention, and postvention strategies and programs in the State of Nevada.

All walkers are welcome. All donations gratefully accepted.
Contributions go to the Nevada Coalition for Suicide Prevention to advance its mission.

For more information call the Nevada Office of Suicide Prevention
(Las Vegas) 702-486-8225 ● (Reno) 775-684-2238
or visit the NCSP website at www.nvsuicideprevention.org


2018 Youth Poster Contest

STOP THE STIGMA!
Stigma makes me feel….. How do you think or know someone experiencing mental health stigma feels?

CLICK HERE TO DOWNLOAD THE POSTER

YOUTH POSTER CONTEST
____
Who: Anyone 17 years old or younger that lives in Clark County, NV
____
How to submit: Visit the Youth Contest Page at www.cccmhc.org
____
QUESTIONS?
Contact
M. Amaris Knight:  cccmhc.nv@gmail.com
____
DEADLINE: Friday, March 23, 2018
CLARK COUNTY CHILDREN’S MENTAL HEALTH CONSORTIUM
WWW.CCCMHC.ORG
CCCMHC.NV@GMAIL.COM
Mental health stigma is the negative attitudes and labels people may experience because they have a mental health issue. Stigma can make it difficult for people to feel accepted or to ask for help. This contest will help bring awareness to the problem of mental health stigma in honor of National Children’s Mental Health Awareness Week in May.

A prize will be awarded to a winner and winning poster may be displayed in schools in Nevada.

All posters must meet the following standards:
 Final poster size will be 17 inches X 22 inches so resolution of final poster must be clear at this size.
 Posters must be original artwork, and may contain multi-media components, no copyrighted material
 Posters will be displayed publicly to all ages, and so should be respectful of others. Avoid bad language or other inappropriate language or images.
 All posters will be submitted digitally as a PDF, JPEG, or PNG file
 Must include text in a type and font that is easy to read
 Parents and teachers may submit an entry on a youth’s behalf
 CCCMHC will include the following information on each poster displayed: For more information about how to stop mental health stigma, visit www.cccmhc.org.